Share this page

« Words to Capitalize in Titles and Headings | Main | Don't Make This Mistake in Your Marketing Messages! »

February 16, 2010

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c02a553ef0120a8a7ad6f970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference A Gentle Way to Point Out a Mistake :

Comments

Account Deleted

Hello Lynn,

This is very good that you shared this experiance instead of just telling about the mistake. This is why we all really like to come at this blog. Cheers from Pakistan. :)

For Susan,

You wrote really well and helped us all to learn. Thanks for doing this all. It's very good to find you.


Waqas

R. Selvaraju

It still doesn't seem to be correct. Shouldn't it be "Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Die and Others Survive" instead of "Others and Survive"?

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Waqas, thanks for your enthusiasm. Hello to Pakistan!

R.Selvaraju, you caught yet another error. I will fix it. Then I will stop typing the name of that book, since I do not seem to be able to type it without making a mistake.

Lynn

Joyce

Hi Lynn,

It's my first time to visit your blog. I found it when I was searching some websites of business writing.
I just want to let you know how exciting when I found your blog. It's great and very useful for me since I'm not an english speaker (so my english is not good) but I know I will learn so much from your blog.
Thanks for your sharing.

Joyce

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Joyce, welcome! Thank you for taking the time to comment. I hope you get many useful ideas here to apply to your writing.

Lynn

R. Selvaraju

Lynn,

Thank you for encouraging people to write correctly. One of the things that bothers me is the pomposity that some people adopt while writing. For example, using "utilize" in the place of "use" or using "granularity" in the place of "detail" and so on. Use of abbreviations or acronyms instead of just plain English also puts me off.

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

R., thank you for mentioning "granularity" vs. "detail." That is an excellent example of an unnecessarily complex word choice.

Lynn

Diane

I totally agree. My department deals with very smart people who make terrible mistakes when writing. We always try to start out by complimenting the authors on something - their analysis, examples, stats - before we get into the things that need correcting. And then we say something like "This piece would be more impactful if we do XYZ."

R. Selvaraju

I am sorry, I am not trying to pick on anyone, but "impactful"?
Won't "effective" be a better word?

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

R., several words are better than "impactful" with the same meaning: effective, powerful, influential, persuasive. I am guessing Diane used the word because it is part of her company's jargon.

Lynn

Pratik

Hello Lynn,
The website and in particular this post is extremely helpful to me (as I feel lack of sense for business writing for self).
I often take offense via emails when I find something wrong within the business processes and it resulted into the scathe in the professional relations although the offense is truly addressed for the betterment.
Here I found a very unique way of pointing out a mistake which is more gentle who practice humanity.

Thanks for posting it.
Cheers,
Pratik

Karla

""This piece would be more impactful if we do XYZ.""--I thought she was making a joke.

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Hi, Pratik. I am delighted you will be able to point out mistakes more gently and tactfully.

Lynn

The comments to this entry are closed.

Google
Business Writing with Heart - How to Build Great Work Relationships One Message at a Time
Assistant Edge
Error Quests
Take your writing from acceptable to excellent.