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May 19, 2011

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Comments

Kevin

That's really interesting. Getting people react to you is sometimes difficult through mails, but these ways seem to work. Thanks for the post.. Keep writing :)

Trevor

This post will be very helpful to me, thank you. Have you written about giving the "brief apology for not responding earlier"? I have recently found myself with a backlog of emails needing replies, because I sent out too many "just following up" emails in a short span of time.

Jeremy

Good tips to get the reader's attention. Another way to get someone to take action, particularly something like passing a message on to their contacts, is to do as much of the work for them as possible. If you take care of the writing and formatting, they can just forward it on! We blogged about this at http://www.whitegloveapps.com/2011/05/19/good-writing-startup-succeed/

Lester Smith

Great post, as usual, Lynn! Each of your examples also demonstrates a personal, human contact that encourages the recipient to continue reading and to respond. Nicely done.

If you're interested, ULiveandLearn treats that particular topic in a recent "Personalize Your Messages" post (http://tinyurl.com/3pfkozd ), which I also mention in a "Caring Is Good Business" post (http://bit.ly/iAJuvy ) at UpWritePress.com.

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Thank you, Kevin, Trevor, Jeremy, and Lester. I appreciate your taking the time to comment.

Trevor, when my email is a bit tardy, I focus on the topic first. That is, I don't start with the apology--I end with it. You have given me an idea for another blog post. Thank you!

Jeremy, I like your idea about doing as much work as you can for the other person, especially an editor. That is good advice.

Lester, I appreciate your links to other blog posts. Your "Caring Is Good Business" is excellent. I was intrigued about the brain research and want to learn more about that. Thanks for sharing!

Lynn

Larry

I usually use approaches 2 and 4, when I need to obtain auditee's comments on drafted audit reports.

On the other side, people don't reply timely always not because they are too busy, but they think your Email or work is not important or helpful to them. So I'm thinking about everyday how to improve quality of my work/service as an internal auditor.

Brad Sorensen

Nice, Lynn. Thanks. Brad

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Larry, improving the quality of your work and service is an exceptional idea. Thank you for sharing it.

Lynn

genny

Hi Lynn,

Thank you very much for this post.
It really helps me in dealing with my emails.
God bless to you and more powers. :)

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Brad and Genny, you are welcome. Thanks for sharing your appreciation.

Lynn

Idara

Really great information here; priceless. Thank you.

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Idara, thanks for your enthusiastic comment.

Lynn

Abhishek

Thanks for this Post, but could you please share some more methods other then these?


Abhishek

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Abhishek, which type of situation do you need help with?

Lynn

Mel

Great post! How do you recommend asking for a meeting or feedback when you sent out an action item, or document for review and no answer.

In my case, I'm looking for a NICE way to request a meeting, since I'm not getting feedback on a document that I understood to be important. It's now 30 days later, and I've followed up each week via email. I've sent out an invite saying:

"Name, Can we meet to finalize the ABC document? I'd like to get this item moving forward or closing out (if possible). If this time does not work with your schedule, please let me know the best time to meet to discuss. Thank you, My Name"
.
This must be said nicely, but also pt out the need to reserve time on the calendar for their review so it doesn't get forgotten.

Suggestions greatly appreciated, thank you,

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Hi, Mel. If you can show your reader how taking action will benefit her or him, do it. Or call rather than write. Or just put the meeting on the individual's calendar, if you can.

Good luck with that challenge!

Lynn

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