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June 25, 2014

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Jasmine pang

I'm one the culprit who use such phrases as I picked them up from my predecessor. So I've learnt a very good lesson today. I use them cos I thought it was polite way of writing.

joanne

Alas, I keep having to edit such meaningless out of the correspondence I review for many ESL colleagues. One day maybe they will go the way of the do-do.

Sanjay I

Thanks...it was learning indeed however may I kindly request you to give one or two correct phrases which can be used when there are attachments to be emailed?

thanks
Sanjay

Jeannette Paladino

Thanks for this post, Lynn. "Enclosed please find..." drives me wild. I'm glad you've shown the alternatives.

Paul

Interesting article, Lynn. As the majority of my correspondence is by email, I normally use "Please see attached..." or "(attached)" as befits the context.
I do get bugged by writers who abbreviate this to "PSA"; I'm afraid I put them in the same category as those who sign off with "Rgds" or worse "BR". Strikes me as plain lazy... But that's another topic for another day!

Anna Banks

Is it still ok to say "Please see attached" when faxing something?

Trecia

Anna, when faxing something, I use, "Please see accompanying..." because it is not attached, but it does accompany.

Christina

I wouldn't get worked up over these three words. In fact, I'd be pleased that someone used the word "please"! And this use of "find" is consistent with the dictionary definition:

find
verb (used with object), found, find·ing.
2.
to locate, attain, or obtain by search or effort: to find an apartment; to find happiness.

I can think of many other writing tics that are much more annoying.

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Hello, Jasmine, Joanne, Sanjay, Jeannette, Paul, Anna, Trecia, and Christina. Thanks for taking the time to comment.

Sanjay, when you review the blog post again, notice the examples that include the word "attached." All of those are fine for emails.

Paul, PSA? OMG. I have never seen that abbreviation. I agree about BR and Rgds. How much regard do they communicate?

Anna, I like Trecia's suggestion, and I believe "attached" also works. You can use a variety of expressions other than "Please see attached." Notice the ones I listed.

Christina, thanks for sharing a different view.

Lynn

Lavaida Vandelia

I use "enclosed please find" when I am referencing a specific enclosure in the envelope and there are multiple enclosures.
When there is only one enclosure, in addition to the letter, I omit that directional phrase.
thanks!

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Hi, Lavaida. You might also want to try "Also enclosed is" or "The enclosed . . . describes . . . "

Lynn

Nicholas

Quite an interesting post! I have been working in an international relations context (UN etc.) in the last few years where such expressions are standard (e.g., "Please find attached") and I thought they were the norm in regular business English as well.
Thanks for alerting me to this.

Kamila

that's a very interesting post. I attended Business English classes run by an American native speaker who is also a very experienced journalist writing for Bloomberg. What she said was something different. While she agreed there are other newer forms, she said that "Enclosed please find/attached" is still commonly used in the business world. We studied Business English using books like "Intelligent Business" or "Market Leader" and this expression is still taught there. What's more, I work for Citibank and receive a lot of emails written by the Americans or the British, and they still use these expressions in their correspondence. And they're quite young people ...So I don't know what to say because you're saying these are obsolete forms, whereas my American and British colleagues and their bosses prove the opposite! I'm confulsed!

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Hi Kamila,

You will notice above that I wrote, "I have seen the phrases 'attached please find' and 'enclosed please find' countless times in other people's writing." Seeing them repeatedly should not convince us that they are good writing.

I have not seen the texts you refer to, so I cannot comment on their contents.

I try to help people write effectively. That often means they must write differently from the people around them.

Thanks for asking your excellent question!

Lynn


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