Business Writing

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Syntax Training | Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

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February 01, 2017

Comments

Kevin S

My poor results reinforce my need to support professional writers!

That was great fun. Thanks Lynn!

Jolene

I missed two. Now to go look up why. :)

Thanks for the brain jolt!

Alex

Hi, aren't both answers for 17th question valid?

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Thanks for taking the challenge, Kevin, Jolene, and Alex.

Kevin, thanks for supporting writers!

Jolene, only two wrong is excellent. Nice work!

Alex, the context in 17 should make it clear that the meaning is "bring about." That meaning requires "effect."

Lynn

Suzan St Maur

Re: number 5 ... although "complements" is more appropriate, you could also use "compliments" if the wine really raises the food's game!
Sz x

Linda Sweeney

I struggle with #8. Pores is a noun as a follicle or opening. Whereas pours is a verb.

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Hi Suzan,

Thanks for stopping by.

Actually "complement" has the meaning of "raising the food's game." "Compliment" means only "pay a compliment to" or "present with a token of esteem." If you have a talking wine, it can compliment the food.

Lynn

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Hi Linda,

Check your dictionary. You will find that "pores" is a verb that means "read or study attentively" among other definitions.

No more struggling with that one!

Lynn

Deborah

14 right! Not bad for a non-native English speaker, isn't it?
My mistakes were:
7 (flesh) - 8 (pores) - 14 (faze): didn't know the idiom, I expected these to be wrong
10 (in to): read too quickly
16 (i.e.) - 19 (Regrettably): I should study the actual meaning of these words!

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Deborah, that's excellent work. And now you will know the ones you missed.

Lynn

Lilli

So many people are "flushing" out things these days. Thanks for helping socialize clarity on that one- drives me CRAZY!

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Lilli, I agree. I frequently see and hear "flushing out."

Lynn

Sang Tran

Thanks, Lynn, for effecting this quiz.

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Hi Sang Tran,

Thanks for using one of the trick words in your sentence. It's not quite the correct way "effecting" is used. Similarly, one would not write "Thanks for bringing about the quiz."

Or were you just kidding me? In any case, thanks for commenting!

Lynn

Olivia MacDonald

Lynn, a late comment/question: I thought "sometime" was an adjective meaning "occasional" or "at some point in the past," and that "some time" would be correct in #12 because it meant "at a specific but unknown or unstated time." Where did I go wrong?

Thanks for your challenges. They make us think!

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Hi Olivia,

You are right that "sometime" can be an adjective, but it's not an adjective in Number 12. It's an adverb.

My MERRIAM-WEBSTER'S says "sometime" is an adverb meaning "at some time in the future" and "at some not specified or definitely known point of time."

Lynn

Olivia MacDonald

Aha, I didn't think of it that way but I see now. I appreciate your responding to my delayed question.

I'm always happy to see a Business Writing entry in my email. The article I found this morning (March 3) is excellent. Your book Business Writing with Heart, mentioned in that article, offers valuable ideas for writing in a variety of tricky situations.

Thanks much.

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

I am glad you like my book, Olivia. Thanks for the plug.

Lynn

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