Business Writing

Talk, tips, and best picks for writers on the job.

Syntax Training | Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Share this page

« Acronyms and SMEs--Help! | Main | A Large Amount of Mistakes »

February 11, 2019

Comments

Kim

I just want to say that I have taken Lynn's Punctuation for Professionals course and it is fantastic! I highly recommend it!

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Kim, thank you so much for your positive words. I am very glad you recommend the course.

Lynn

Bart Rosenberg

Hummingbird is one word, like woodpecker. The ad infers that the feeder hums...or do the birds hum? Do they hum because they don't know the words, or is it that neither has lips?

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Hi Bart,

I am guessing they don't know the words. Thanks for your wit.

Lynn

Billie

Kim, thanks for the endorsement about Lynn's Punctuation for Professionals course. I've followed Lynn for years. Her Business Writing posts are often part of our breakfast ritual where we see how much we know, and more importantly what we don't know or think we did. I have now added Lynn's course to my tasks for 2019

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Billie, thank you for your kind words! I hope you do take the course.

Lynn

Tash

Hello,
Which is correct please. 'A Mrs. Smith from the office called'. Or, 'A, Mrs. Smith from the office called'.
(Punctuation comma after the A or no comma after the A?)

Lynn Gaertner-Johnston

Tash, that's an interesting question. Either could be correct, depending on the circumstances.

Your first choice--A Mrs. Smith from the office called--is correct if you are using the expression "A Mrs. Smith" as in "someone named Mrs. Smith." That's probably your intended meaning.

However, your second choice--A, Mrs. Smith from the office called--is correct if you are writing to someone who goes by the name "A." The purpose of the comma would be direct address, that is, you are directly addressing the reader.

I hope that helps.

Lynn

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Your Information

(Name and email address are required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)

Share this page
© 2005-present - Syntax Training - All Rights Reserved