Home Common Expressions

Common Expressions

Nobody wants to be known as a boring conversationalist, and one way to avoid that reputation is to steer clear of predictable speech patterns. Do you overuse the phrase "per our conversation?" Here are five less frequently-used variations to try out! As Mentioned As Agreed Following our conversation Pursuant...
What Are Transition Words? Transitions, or transition words, are used to connect ideas within a piece of writing. In this article, we'll introduce you to some helpful transitional phrases and explain how to use them effectively.  The Importance and Function of Transitions In any form of writing, your goal is to share...
Vice versa comes from Latin. The phrase is used to say "the other way around." Vice versa is often used as an adverb, and it doesn't require a hyphen (nor a dash) between the two words. Unless you're discussing the term itself (as we are now), vice versa doesn't need to be...
Looking to voice your agreement with someone during a heated debate? You should shout "hear, hear," especially if you're a member of Parliament! Of course, if you're shouting, nobody will notice your error if you shout "here, here" since the words sound exactly the same. Parliamentarism is a big part...
Updated 31 August, 2021.  Albeit is an interesting word that can be heard today from time to time. If you wish to add a bit of colour and flair to your writing or speech, adding it could certainly do that. But first, let's learn a few facts about this old conjuction. What...
OK or Okay: Which To Use? Whether it's OK or okay, you hear the phrase on a daily basis. You see it print, television, online, etc. In fact, the phrase okay has been described as the most written and spoken phrase in the world. One of the reasons is that it is used...
If you've missed your colleague's (friend's, family member's, etc.) birthday and you are sending your best wishes late, there are many options for how to say that you're sorry you're late and to wish them a happy birthday nonetheless. However, if you're choosing to use the word "belated," there...
  A moot point is a fact that is irrelevant because it does not pertain to the current situation.  Moot rhymes with "root."  The phrase "mute point" does not exist; it's a mistake. The Definition of Moot (and the Subsequent Expression) The definition of moot  is "subjected to discussion" or "up for debate." However, it can also...
The subjunctive form often confuses many writers, leaving them thinking: is it if I was or were?  Why don't we take a closer look and clear up any confusion. General Rule: You should use were (in place of was) when the statement is contrary to fact. Statements that are contrary to fact often begin with...
Updated June 29, 2021 - Being a bachelor is not a requirement to receive a bachelor's degree, but one does need to show mastery in order to obtain a master's degree. In any case, you should be able to correctly spell the degree you have; spelling them as masters degree and bachelors degree is wrong....