"Wrack" comes from a form of "wreck" and has meanings relating to ruin or destruction. "Rack" has several meaning varieties, one of which references the torture device that stretches out people on a wooden frame.  The correct spelling of the phrase is "racking your brain." People often misspell words...
All Riled Up Definition:  Extremely annoyed, vexed, or hyperactive. The Origin of All Riled Up The phrase comes from the verb roil, which first appeared in the 1500s. The word rile appeared in the 1800s and reflected a change in spelling and pronunciation from roil, even though the definition stayed the same. Both roil and rile can mean bothering someone or making...
The idioms "at all costs" and "at any cost" are interchangeable The acceptable way to spell "at all costs" is in the plural form (with an 's' at the end) "At all costs" and "at any cost" are two versions of the exact same idiom. An idiom is a...
Why You Should Use “Not Only . . . But Also”  Although it may sound odd, using “not only. . . but also” in your writing can add a lot of strength and depth to your voice. In short, it can easily add parallelism to your writing, which creates a simple reading...
What is the meaning of being "Under the Weather?"  The phrase means that someone feels sick or sad. For example: I am not going to work because I feel under the weather. Here are a few phrases with similar meanings: sick as a dog, in a bad way, not feeling so hot. Origins This phrase...
In common use, the indefinite pronouns no one and nobody is often incorrectly used interchangeably with none. The first two are singular and have the same meaning. However, none can often have different meanings, with a singular or plural usage.  Using Nobody As an indefinite pronoun, nobody does refer to specific people. Instead, it means the same thing as no person. It...
Ramping up and amping up sound very similar. How much difference does the letter “r” make in these phrases? Similarities Both ramping up and amping up refer to something increasing. They also look and sound very nearly the same. Ramping up If you imagine a ramp, you can see how it slowly increases...
Should you use "no one" or "nobody?" In English, there are many synonymous options for us to use. While this can often be useful in helping us create unique pieces of writing, it can often be a big headache for new writers. With this, what are some of the...
Have you ever heard the phrase “heebie-jeebies”? This silly-sounding phrase means “a feeling of anxiety, illness, or apprehension." Neither “heebie” or “jeebie” mean anything by themselves. During the 1920s in the United States of America, many similar phrases became popular. For example, “hocus-pocus,” “the bee’s knees,” and “mumbo-jumbo.” These kinds...
What Does In Regard To Mean? Let's discuss the meaning of the phrase "in regard to" or "in regards to." To put it simply, with regard or in regards to are phrases used to mean regarding, concerning, or interested on the subject of. They are used to connect ideas within sentences. For instance, you may see this in...