“Season’s Greetings” is the proper form of the expression, capitalizing each word while adding the apostrophe between the “n” and “s” in seasons.  “Happy Holidays” does not require an apostrophe at all, and you will capitalize each word. December is full of holidays, celebrating a wide variety of ideals...
  “Beck and Call” is the proper spelling of the expression and is used to describe situations where one person does whatever is asked of them by another. “Beckon Call” and “Bacon Call” are errors most likely caused by mishearing the proper expression.  Have you ever heard an expression over...
Sometimes when describing something quite large, you may hear the adjective "ginormous" used to describe it. The word is fun but doesn't sound like something you'd find in a legitimate dictionary.  Is this a real word?  Where did it originate?  Well, the answers may very well surprise you!  Let's dig deep into the...
The common phrase “For all intents and purposes” is defined as “in effect.” Try not to confuse this expression with “for all intensive purposes”, a result of common mishearing or misinterpretation If you conduct business, you have most likely come across the phrase “for all intents and purposes.” What...
The Great “-Esque” Escapade: How To Use This Suffix Properly You’ve probably seen the suffix -esque used before, but do you understand how it works so that you can feel confident in making use of it yourself?  The ability to use appropriate grammar, including suffixes, can give you versatility in your...
The correct spelling is "nerve-racking." The phrase describes something that makes you very nervous and uneasy. "Nerve-wracking" has become an accepted variant, although some language purists may take issue with this alternative. There are a lot of expressions involving the nerves (and the brain), which include the word wrack...
English grammar can cause anyone frustration, as it is rife with exceptions to rules and alternate usages of words and phrases. This is what makes the language difficult for non-native speakers and native-speakers alike. One phrase which is regularly misused is “as of yet”, which is further complicated due to...
About seven hundred years ago, the word affinity meant "relation by marriage." By extension, the correct use of affinity concerns mutuality. But that sense of mutual interest is often missing in contemporary uses of affinity, such as these:  "He's always had an affinity for growing tomatoes." "They have an affinity for vintage clothes." "My aunt...
There is a lot of debate between whether it is correct to use none is, or none are. When you understand these phrases, then you can use them correctly. There is one main issue that causes a lot of confusion: None Can Be Both Singular and Plural If none is used as a singular, then none are is incorrect....
The word Former  refers to something that is first in the order of two or more items or things. The word Latter refers to something that is either second in a group of two things or the last in a group of many. Some usage guides dictate that you can only...