The saying, “go to hell in a handbasket” is another way of saying to “deteriorate” or “become a disaster.” It is normally used to describe when things aren’t going very well for a person. It can also describe when someone’s actions lead them in the wrong direction.  How Did “Go To Hell...
We all need a hero sometimes.  But what if the tasks calls for more that one hero? Should we simply add an "s" at the end to end up with "heros?"  No, that would indeed be incorrect.  So what is the plural of "hero?"  In short, the correct plural form...
Can You Use “Fastly?”  Have you ever wondered find yourself wondering: "is 'fastly' a word?" “Fast”is a special type of adjective that can double as an adverb without requiring any change. In other words, if you want to describe an action or a noun, you can simply say “fast.” Adding an...
Is one "oriented" or "orientated?" It is common in English to hear people say both “orient” and “orientate” in everyday speech. Both verbs mean “to align or position yourself in a literal or theoretical environment.” Additionally, both words originated from the Latin root “oriens,” which means “rising/east.”  Additionally, when used as a noun, “orient” can...
The definition of "Bupkis" is something that is worthless or has no value (origin: Yiddish language) It can also mean "nothing." While it is not as common an expression as it used to be, from time to time, you may hear someone use the word "bupkis" in a sentence,...
  “Beck and Call” is the proper spelling of the expression and is used to describe situations where one person does whatever is asked of them by another. “Beckon Call” and “Bacon Call” are errors most likely caused by mishearing the proper expression.  Have you ever heard an expression over...
Sometimes when describing something quite large, you may hear the adjective "ginormous" used to describe it. The word is fun but doesn't sound like something you'd find in a legitimate dictionary.  Is this a real word?  Where did it originate?  Well, the answers may very well surprise you!  Let's dig deep into the...
There is an expression beyond the shadow of a doubt. It means that something is true, without the remotest possibility that it could be false. If you were to declare your absolute certainty of something, you would say that it was true beyond the shadow of a doubt. Alternatively, you...
Merriam-Webster raised the tempers of pompous grammarians last week when it affirmed the linguistic authenticity of "irregardless." The definition of the word, when reading it, seems to be: without without regard. "The word Irregardless is included in our dictionary because it's been in widespread and near-constant use since 1795," said a...
The English language, the language of Shakespeare, can be very expressive and flexible in communicating thoughts and ideas. For instance, we might write or say something like: "that guitar has been lounging in my living-room corner since Bush was president." Most of us may understand what that sentence conveys, but...