Compound words sometimes don’t have the same meaning as the individual words they comprise. For example - anytime and any time,  It’s a situation where the whole is different from the total of its parts. Every day and everyday are similar—everyday (without a space) does not mean the same...
Is it Into or In To? This is actually a common error, although it really shouldn't be. When choosing between the two, remember that into is a preposition that shows what something is within or inside. As separate words, in and to sometimes just simply end up next to...
As a noun, gray  is usually in reference to the color. It can also be used as an adjective when we want to say that the color of something is simply a shade of gray. It can be used as a verb  as well, for when something grays (i.e., turns gray, such as hair). But regardless of its...
There is a bad habit among writers to use ornate phrases where a single word will do. The English language is full of such terms. Sometimes, there can be multiple variations of the same phrase. An example of this is in regard to and in regards to. Let’s dig in...
Considering how similarly immigrate and emigrate sound, it is understandable for people to wonder if they are alternate spellings of the same word. Emigrate’s Definition Firstly, emigrate does not mean the same thing as immigrate. Emigrate has a specific definition: to depart one place – for example, a nation or state...
One frequent error that writers make involves homophones, or different words that sound the same when spoken. Anyone who has ever had to choose the correct option between poor, pour, and pore can surely relate. Another homophone quandary involves the words callous and callus. History of Both Words Choosing the wrong word...
The English language contains many homophones that can be confusing for both native and non-native speakers. While speakers typically move right past homophones, many writers are left unsure of which word to use. One example of a confusing set of homophones is "passed" and "past." Although these words sound...
Remember this: The word "complement" is related to the word "completion." Meanwhile, the word "compliment" refers to flattering acts or words.  Everyone loves a compliment. Or is it a complement everybody loves? In any published list of commonly confused words, you're sure to find these two. However, complement and compliment...
Wether is a word that often slips past spell check. This is thanks to the fact that it's easily confused with two homonyms, whether and weather. It's easy to miss the single letter that separates these words as you're typing along! And unless you happen to be a farmer, you probably didn't know...
Let's talk farther vs. further. You'll see people using both farther and further to mean "more distant." In American English, however, most speakers favor the word farther for physical distances and further for figurative distances.  Farther It isn't too surprising to learn that farther is defined as "at or to a greater distance." Here's an example of the word in context:...