A, an, and the are special types of adjectives often referred to as "articles" or "article adjectives." Rather than describing a noun as standard adjectives do, they limit it, determining whether it is specific or general. Many other languages do not have articles or use a single article. As a...
If since is being used as a preposition, then it doesn’t need a comma: You haven’t been here since lunch. She’s long since forgotten his name. There are times that since is used as a subordinating conjunction to replace the word “because.” If since is at the beginning of a...
There is an expression beyond the shadow of a doubt. It means that something is true, without the remotest possibility that it could be false. If you were to declare your absolute certainty of something, you would say that it was true beyond the shadow of a doubt. Alternatively, you...
For two relatively small words, to and too can cause a lot of headaches. Educators, editors, and general grammar nerds are constantly correcting the misuse of these simple words. Using To Correctly Let’s begin with the basics. The word to is a preposition, indicating direction toward something. Yet, it is pretty...
No one escapes high school English without being penalized for writing a sentence fragment here and there, and unfortunately not everyone remembers what they are and how to fix them. Simply put, a sentence fragment is a clause that falls short of true sentencehood because it's missing one out...
You probably already know that a noun is a word that denotes a person, place, thing, or idea—this is a concept we learn relatively early in school. Needless to say, there are several different types of nouns that we use to depict everything we experience during our life: We...
Have you ever debated whether to use hanged vs. hung in a sentence? Were you writing about an execution? The word hanged  refers to a person’s death at the end of a rope. That is its sole correct usage. If no one is dead, then you shouldn’t use hanged. Hung’s Relationship to...
Is it Into or In To? This is actually a common error, although it really shouldn't be. When choosing between the two, remember that into is a preposition that shows what something is within or inside. As separate words, in and to sometimes just simply end up next to...
The English language, the language of Shakespeare, can be very expressive and flexible in communicating thoughts and ideas. For instance, we might write or say something like: "that guitar has been lounging in my living-room corner since Bush was president." Most of us may understand what that sentence conveys, but...
Even people who have spoken and written English their whole lives can become confused about an expression used for a shared association. Many wonder whether this expression should be written eachother or each other. Luckily, the solution to this quandary is straightforward. Each other should always be two words separated...