To understand plural nouns, we must understand that singular nouns are words that describe a single person, place, thing, abstract idea, or thought. In most cases, plural nouns refer to multiple of these and are often formed by adding an "-s" at the end of a singular noun. There are,...
To answer the question quickly, "ad nauseam" is a phrase that originates from Latin. When translated literally, it means "to nausea." In modern usage, it usually refers to something used so often that it makes you sick of it. When using it in your writing, you don't need to italicize "ad...
More recently, there has been an uproar about using words that end in "-ism" to describe specific types of discrimination. While there are some commonly known ones (such as "racism" and "sexism"), you may be interested to know some less-common ones, some as "beautyism." Let's take a look at its definition and put...
Let's take a look at "Sarcastic" vs. "Sardonic." These two English words have similar spelling and similar pronunciations. Even though they have these similarities, they have different origins, unique meanings, and particular usages that separate them.  What Does "Sarcastic" Mean?  "Sarcastic" is a word that refers to comments that are sharp, mean, taunting, or bitter....
Nominalizations are specific nouns that are formed from verbs and adjectives. The word “evaporation” is a nominalization of “evaporate,” and “optimization” is a nominalization of “optimize.” Take a look at some common nominalized nouns that arise from verbs. While reading, try to guess what their original verb form was!  Mechanization Distortion Requirement Imposition ...
The expression free rein stemmed from horseback riding. The rider holds the reins, leather straps connected to a metal bit in the horse's mouth, and handles the horse by pulling on the straps differently. When you give a horse free rein, you'll hold the reins loosely so the animal can wander where it wants....
The expression “to a T” - as in “That fits you to a T!” - is often incorrectly written or spoken as “to the T” (or “to a tee” or “to the tee”). This same kind of mistake often occurs in everyday phrases such as “all of the sudden” and...
You may have seen a sleeping person's snoring indicated by "Zzz "in popular media. From cartoons to comic books, this colloquial phenomenon has a grasp on American culture. With this, what does "Zzz" actually mean?  What Does "Zzz" Actually Mean?  As you have probably guessed, "Zzz" is a common representation that someone is sleeping. It...
Definition Of “Literary Antagonist” An antagonist is an individual or group of individuals who oppose a central protagonist (or the main character). In its Greek origin, “antagonist” can be traced back to words that mean “rival” or “opponent.” In literature, antagonists are usually needed to add drama and action and move the story along.  In most...
In common writing, you may find that people make many contradictions with themselves. From politicians to playwrights, most people can't stick to one stance. With this, however, are there any literary devices that writers can use to harness this power of contradiction? There are! Oxymorons are literary tools that...