The Difference Between Manner and Manor

The Difference Between Manner and Manor

The words “manner” and “manor” are pronounced the same. So, they are often confused in writing. Here are some helpful tips to remember the difference between them.

Definition of Manner

“Manner” is a noun that means how something is achieved or carried out. Some synonyms for “manner” include “way,” and “how something is done.”

Here are some helpful example sentences:

He looked at the princess in a flirtatious manner.

The manner of his firing caused a lot of upset.

“Manner” can also describe the behavior or attitude of someone or something:

His rude manner was annoying to everyone.

“Manners” is the plural of “manner.” “Manners” refers to social behavior.

Some children have no manners.

Jenna’s mother taught her good manners.

So there is a difference between the “manner” and “manners,” they both refer to human behavior.

Definition of Manor

“Manor” is a noun that means a large house or mansion and the land around it. This term is used in a sentence like this:

The manor belonged to the George family for many generations.

The fifteenth-century manor was in ruins.

“Manors” is the plural form of “manor.” For example:

She liked to stay in both tiny huts and large manors.

In UK slang, “manor” refers to an area that someone exercises power over. It is often used in relation to crime or policing:

The officer patrolled his manor.

So, the word “manor” always refers to a building or an area of land.

Manner vs. Manor

When you want to use the words “manner” and “manor” in your writing, remember that:

  • Manner refers to a person’s attitude or how something is done. “Manners” refers to socially correct behavior.
  • manor is a large house and the land belonging to it.

Here is a helpful phrase to remember the difference: “Living in a manor does not give you manners.”

 

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