The symbol used for the word and (&) is called an ampersand. It is a logogram (also called a logograph), which is a written symbol that stands for an entire word or phrase. The ampersand's origin is the Latin conjunction "et," which means "and." This symbol (&) is a ligature...
There's often confusion regarding the past tense of the verb lead. The correct past tense is led, not lead. A reason for this confusion could be that read, a similar verb, has a past tense that's spelled the same as the infinitive. However, that's not the same case with lead. The correct spelling of...
A situation where you'll often have to make a judgment call regarding comma usage is when using the phrase "as well as." Normally, you don't need to include a comma before the phrase.  As Well As "As well as" is a conjunction.  It means “in addition to.” Please proofread for spelling...
What is Etc. (Et Cetera)? A Latin phrase, Et cetera combines the words Et, which means "and," and Cetera, which means "the rest." The abbreviation of et cetera is etc.  You can use etc. when you present a list that you will not complete. It tells the reader that the list has other items, in addition to the ones you...
The words who's and whose may sound the same, but knowing when to use each one correctly can be challenging. Who's is a contraction that combines the words who is or who has. Meanwhile, whose is the possessive form of who. For an in-depth explanation of the difference, read on. Who’s vs. Whose The words who's and whose both come from the pronoun who. Who's is a contraction,...
Let's talk farther vs. further. You'll see people using both farther and further to mean "more distant." In American English, however, most speakers favor the word farther for physical distances and further for figurative distances.  Farther It isn't too surprising to learn that farther is defined as "at or to a greater distance." Here's an example of the word in context:...
Whether you're learning English or studying grammar, there are several terms you're likely to come across. Two of them are "predicate nominative" and "predicate adjective." Both of these are types of "predicate complements." Although this can sound complex, the good news is that these terms are pretty easy to understand...
If you frequently mix up the phrases use to and used to, don't feel bad--it's a pretty common mistake! Used to is a phrase that means "accustomed or habituated to," and it can also refer to something from the past that no longer holds true. Both use to and used to are frequently used in English grammar as...
Have you ever met two people who share many of the same features? They can be hard to tell apart at first glance! But one way to learn the differences between them is simply to get to know them better; even identical twins have unique characteristics. The same goes for...
When presenting two alternatives, you'll often use a "neither ... nor" or an "either ... or" construction. Here's how these constructions work in a sentence: You can choose either pancakes or waffles for your breakfast. My dad's car is neither brown nor green. Either is used to present possibilities that are both valid and true; it's used in an affirmative...