Whenever you talk to someone in person or online, it is customary to give a proper address such as “good morning” or “good afternoon.” Sounds easy enough, but how would you capitate these? Let's take a look.  In general, both “good morning” and “good afternoon”  should only be capitalized when used at the beginning...
Is "Funnier" A Word?  Comparative diction in English can be a very challenging thing. Some words have comparatives built-in, while others need to be paired with "more" or "less" to be correct. Funny, however, has its own unique rules and can change depending on how you are using it.  In short, "funnier" is technically a word;...
What Are Reflexive Pronouns? Reflexive pronouns are a unique type of pronoun utilized for the object of a verb when referring to the same noun as the subject of the verb. In English, most reflexive pronouns end with “self” or “selves.” Some common examples include: “himself,” “ourselves,” “herself,” etc.  Most sources agree that if...
Fundamental Components Of Sentences  To understand basic sentence structures, it is important to know the fundamental components that make them up.  Independent Clauses  Independent clauses are clauses that are characterized by the ability to stand alone as their unique sentence. This means they contain a subject and a verb, creating a stand-alone...
Do we capitalize cardinal directions such as "north" or "south"? Let's start with a few quick answers: Generally, directional words will be lowercase when referring to a non-specific direction or location. However, capitalize them if they are part of the name of a specific (proper) noun. These words will...
Notice, by definition, is given in advance, isn't it? If that's true, is the expression “advance notice” redundant? Or worse, is it inaccurate? These questions need answers! Advance Notice According to BusinessDictionary.com, advance notice alerts a future event or obligation. For instance, you might receive information regarding the due date of a...
"Inbetween" is an improper form of the word and should not appear in writing. "In between" is generally accepted in speech, but when writing, eliminate "in" and use the more concise "between" instead.  "In-between" is grammatically correct when the word is used as an adjective, indicating an existence...
  If you hesitate to use "crisis" or "crises" because you are unsure which is proper, you are not alone. Read on to understand how to use each form of the word correctly.A crisis is a severe situation that can have severe consequences. "Crisis" is the singular form of...
  Each version of the expression is proper – the problem lies in their misuse. "In behalf of" means that the target of the expression is benefitting in some way. "On behalf of" is used when representing another person or organization.   One of many similar expressions that cause writers (and...
Both "supposed to" and "supposed" have proper usages; however, "suppose to" is an incorrect form of "supposed to." "Supposed to" indicates an expectation of responsibility. "Suppose" conveys an assumption.  Many people make mistakes when using forms of the verb "suppose," especially when speaking. Nonetheless, there is a right and a...