A complex sentence is a sentence that includes one independent clause and at least one dependent clause. They work best when you need to provide more information to modify or explain your sentence’s main point. Complex sentences are simple to spot as they often use subordinating conjunctions like because,...
  An imperative sentence gives a demand, command, or instruction directly to an audience and typically begins with an action word (a verb). These sentences often appear to be missing a subject or the person, place, or thing that performs a main action. This is because the subject in this...
Updated 02 November 2021: The word stupid is two syllables long. As an adjective, it can take both comparative and superlative forms. Stupid can take these forms either with a suffix (-er or ­-est) or with a preceding word (more or most). Both constructions are correct. Stupider or More Stupid? To...
Updated 28, November 2021: Good vs. Well: as small and simple as they might seem, these two words can confuse writers. Knowing which word to use in a sentence often poses a challenge. Remembering Parts of Speech The key thing to know is that good is an adjective while well is an...
Onto vs. on to - its not always easy to differentiate between the two expressions. They sound identical, and when written out, they only look different because of a tiny space. You could be forgiven for thinking onto and on to mean precisely the same thing. However, there is a distinction between...
What are Pronouns? Firstly, pronouns are nouns, but they comprise a particular subcategory. Pronouns’ function is to take the place of other nouns. Here is an illustration. If you were writing an essay about Henry V, you would not want to say his full name repeatedly. The essay would sound...
The term “linking verb” refers to a verb that connects the subject of a sentence to information about the subject. Linking verbs do not relay an action but instead link the subject and the other statement details. Perhaps the most common linking verb is to be. However, there are...
Most of us know the rule about putting “a” before words that start with consonants and “an” in front of words that start with vowels but as it turns out, it’s actually more complicated than that. For example, here's a question from a student: I'm wondering if it is actually...
Bi- is a prefix that means twice or two; semi- is a prefix meaning half. Do you receive a paycheck on the fifteenth and thirtieth of each month? Would you say you are paid bi-monthly or semimonthly?If a magazine is published every two weeks, it is a biweekly or a bimonthly issue? Well, the...
A proper noun is a distinct (not general) name for a distinct person, place, or thing. When writing in English, proper nouns are capitalized all the time, no matter where you happen to see them in a sentence. Because they supply nouns with a distinct name, they will often...