Should You Use “Fared” Or “Faired?”

Is it faired or fared?  Most of the time “fared” is the correct choice. Let’s have a deeper look.

What Does “Fare” Mean? 

“Fare” is a verb that means something “get through or get along.” It originated from the Old English verb “faran” (to travel). As a side note, there is a really cool website that lets you look up Old English words called old-engli.sh (for the language nerds out there!). 

an excerpt from the Old English dictionary that defines Faran as the origin of the verb Fare: faran1 [] sv/i6 3rd pres færð past fór/on ptp is gefaren to set forth, go, travel, wander, proceed; be, happen, exist, act; fare, get on, undergo, suffer; ge~ die; ge~ attack, overcome, capture, obtain; west onbútan ~ to go west about"

Read some of the example sentences that use “fare” below:

  • I hope you fare well will all of your upcoming work! 
  • How will my pets fare without me for the weekend? 
  • Although global pandemics have taken a toll on the world, many people will fare well. 

Using “Fared” And “Faired” 

It is common for writers to often use “faired” when referring to the verb “fare.” In short, this is incorrect, as “faired” is a verb form of the adjectivefair.” That would be the most common use of “faired,” as in something becoming more “fair” (more attractive).  Although, the used of “faired” is rather uncommon amongst native speakers, so its best avoided. In other words, you should always use “fared” when you are trying to write “fare” in the past tense. 

Correct And Incorrect Examples Of “Fared”

Let’s consider some correct and incorrect examples attempting to use “fare” in the past tense. In these sentence pairs, the first example group will show the correct use of “fared,” whereas the second will show the incorrect use of “faired.”

Correct examples include: 

  • People are always nervous about Samantha during her shows. No matter what happens, though, she will always fare pretty well! 
  • Don’t worry about me. I tend to fare well in bad situations.
  • Predicting how animals will fare when threatened is a hard task. 
  • Regardless of all the challenges we faced along the way; We fared well. 
  • Due to the increased rainfall in Southern California, southern grape plants fared better than those in the north. 

Incorrect examples include: 

  • People are always nervous about Samatha during her shows. No matter what happens, though, she will always fair pretty well! 
  • Don’t worry about me; I tend to fair well in bad situations.
  • Predicting how animals will fair when threatened is a hard task.
  • Regardless of all the challenges we faced along the way; we faired well. 
  • Due to the increased rainfall in Southern California, southern grape plants faired better than those in the north. 

Correct use of “Faired”

  • After hours of rain, it seemed the weather was fairing off.
  • Like a good wine, she has faired over the years.
  • As nature took its course, the pond faired with every season.

Examples from the Media

The clout of German unions, at individual companies and in the political system, is one reason the middle class there has fared decently in recent decades. – The New York Times

The hull, which was slightly asymmetrical as a result of its age, was faired and re-scanned. – The New York Times

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here